Category Archives: Courts

Countdown to At Home in WWI Exhibition: 5 days to go!

One of the things that our project looks at is housing development and conditions in the western suburbs of Derby during the late 19th and early 20th century, so we’ll be displaying a few maps showing changes. Part of this investigation includes looking at the impact of travel amenities upon the development of estates on the outskirts of town in the years running up to WWI. On Saturday we’ll do this by exhibiting a few early photos and maps that show these changes, and material culture that relates to domestic electricity at this time. We’ll also consider how those without a fridge – most households – managed food storage on hot days, in over-crowded vermin-infested housing…

cockroach

 

Countdown to At Home in WWI Exhibition: 7 days to go!

Less than a week to go now until the exhibition! Still lots to do, but we have more to show now after the preparations began in March.

We hope to include information on Mr Grundy – after whom the pub ‘next door’ to our exhibition venue is named, where this WW1 soldier lived after the war. One of our volunteers is working on a display that brings together the information already gathered by staff on Mr Grundy – to whom we’re very grateful for his kindness in not only sharing this information with us, but also for going to the trouble of getting copies ready for us.

We also hope to provide displays on a few local people – some ancestors of those involved with the exhibition – who served in the Great war; we are fortunate in being permitted to display some *fantastic* photos from the period, which I really look forward to seeing printed out, as well as other mementos and keepsakes.

Countdown to At Home in WWI Exhibition: 8 days to go!

Our exhibition is a week tomorrow, so we’re starting to pull things together – although work continues on some of the displays.

Today the study area and historic maps have been printed out, to go with information on the project – what we’re doing, and how we do it! – and on how members of the public can take part.

We’ll also be displaying historic photos – thanks to Derek Palmer – and oral history, to other perspectives on life in the western suburbs of Derby in the early 20th century. So far, this has focused on housing, and sanitation – not a savoury topic, but an important source of archaeological finds!

Our sanitation artefact display will include objects that will be familiar to anyone who – like our project director – has lived in a house without an indoor toilet!

Back tomorrow with another round-up of preparations for our forthcoming exhibition.

Countdown to At Home in WWI Exhibition: 9 days to go!

With 9 days to go until our WWI centenary event, exhibits that we’re currently working on include clothing and dress accessories at the outbreak of the war. We will have have a beautiful 1910s dress bodice on display, and will be exhibiting a number of ‘small finds’ of the era (including a sweet little boot-button-cum-teddy-bear-eye!) that commonly turn up in excavations, and as surface finds – with info on ‘what you might find in the garden’. And we have information on corsets in wartime!

For more on the exhibition, follow this link

Countdown to At Home in WWI Exhibition: 10 days to go!

In 10 days (19 July) LIPCAP will be holding an exhibition – ‘At Home in WWI‘ – as part of the annual CBA Festival of Archaeology. We’re using domestic material culture (household objects and housing), alongside photos, maps, oral history, and written sources (such as newspapers and trade directories) to look at home life in Derby at the outbreak of war. We’ll use the run-up to the exhibition to introduce some of the objects and topics we’ll have on display.

One theme of the exhibition is the ‘Material World at War’. The section displays different materials used in the home during the WWI era, touching upon some of the technological developments, and cultural changes at this time, and the impact of innovations on the material environment of the home. This has involved looking at the some of the natural materials (such as bone, horn and ivory) that had long been used for household objects, and the replacement of these organic materials with the introduction of early plastics into the home. 

So why not come along to the exhibition and see if you can tell early plastics from the ‘genuine article’ – can YOU spot a early fake?!  

More tomorrow on what we have done for At Home in WWI!

Custodians of Home Conference: LIPCAP presentation

*Update: Podcasts from this conference are now available online. The paper given by the project director about Living in the Past Community Archaeology Project is directly available here.*

Geffrye Museum entrance

 Geffrye Museum (Wikipedia image)

The ‘Custodians of Home’ conference, held at the fabulous Geffrye Museum (well worth a visit!) last Friday, was a great success – with exception of my LIPCAP paper, which due to a technical fault, displayed a palimpsest of images on each slide, instead of multiple fade in-and-out photos & text boxes.

I’ve created a video of the slide show, should any of the delegates (or anyone else, for that matter) wish to see what should have been visible on the day. For now, this is a low-resolution version (all my laptop can cope with at the moment!), but I’ll uploaded a higher quality version when possible.

(A downloadable PDF version of this paper is available here: Living_in_the_Past_Custodians_Online_PDF)

must again extend thanks to the organisers for inviting me to give a paper at the conference, and – along with others – providing encouragement and very useful advice and information.

I would love to attend all the great events provided by Queen Mary’s and the very interesting Living with the Past at Home project in the near future, but unfortunately time and (especially) money prevent me from doing so (one of the many downsides of carrying out independent research 🙁 ). But hopefully I’ll make it to at least another event before the series ends.

LIPCAP Study Area Historic Map Overlays: 1880s

The following maps show the buildings recorded on the 1880s maps (1881 1:2500 Country Series for Allestree; 1883 1:500 Town Plan for the other study areas) overlaid on satellite images of the areas in the present day (2013)

For larger versions of the maps, click on the images.

If you live in any of these areas, and you are able to recognise the location of your home, you should be abl to see if there was a building there in the 1880s, and whether this was a house, or had another function.

Study Area One: Allestree Village. 1881 Map Google Earth Overlay

Study Area Two: Little Chester. 1881-83 map Google Earth Overlay

Study Area Two: Little Chester. 1881-83 map Google Earth Overlay 

Study Area Three: West End, Derby. 1883 map Google Earth Overlay

Study Area Three: West End, Derby. 1883 map Google Earth Overlay 

Study Area Four: Friar Gate. 1883 Map Google Earth Overlay

Study Area Four: Friar Gate. 1883 Map Google Earth Overlay